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Kitten Who Can’t Walk Learns How To Cat From Older Feline Influences

Oh, little Finnegan, how I want to scritch your chin again…and again and again!

From the care of Ellen Carozza LVT with the Nova Cat Clinic and the Chris Griffey Memorial Feline Foundation comes another adorable kitten, and he’s well on his way to strong and healthy as the newest member of #teamscratchndent.

Only a few weeks old, Finnegan arrived in Ellen’s hands with what she described as “a wicked abscess behind his left ear.” The tiny tabby kitten was also experiencing neurological difficulties, leaving him unable to sit on his own or walk.

Ellen told Love Meow, “He was absurdly small for his size for his birth date being January 3rd. He was quite wobbly to the point he could not hold himself up.”

@thecatlvt/Instagram
@thecatlvt/Instagram

The cat lovers of Nova Cat Clinic went to work right away on the baby, giving him antibiotics, tasty food and supplements, and lots of hugs. Feeding time also required extra care as Finn couldn’t even sit up on his own to take a bottle.

Big Bacteria for a Little Kitten

At first, it was unclear what was causing Finn’s inability to stand and walk. But after culturing the lump on his little ear and taking X-rays, the team learned what had the baby down.

“We found out the cause of his abscess, which was a Beta-hemolytic Streptococcus infection, and is usually passed from an infected Queen (mom), and the antibiotics we had him on was appropriate for his treatment course.”

As the antibiotics went to work defeating the infection, Finn discovered some big furry friends who were eager to teach him the ways of the cat.

Big Kitties Love the Little Kitty

Ellen’s forever cat buddy, Benedict, was smitten with the kitten right away, happy to give the baby his Benny Blessing.

@thecatlvt/Instagram

“Benedict, the ultimate cat dad, had to give him his signature ‘blessings’ when he met Finn. Having older cats in the house that enjoy kittens, really helps the kitten learn how to be a cat.”

Loki, Benny’s brother, also enjoys loafing around with Finn too…

@thecatlvt/Instagram

 

And when learning how to cat, sometimes one must deal with other kitties and their cranky moods! But Finn handled the cranky pants well, throwing up his itty-bitty claws from the comfort of his breadbasket.

@thecatlvt/Instagram

 

“You don’t need a mom cat all the time to help raise them,” explained, Ellen, “you just need a cat with an amazing personality and the patience that enjoys the presence of kittens.”

Stronger Everyday

When Finn first set paw into Ellen’s care, he was a weak baby who didn’t feel good, but “after a week, he finally started feeling better enough to use a bottle slowly, and now he eats with gusto.”

With his healthy appetite came weight gain, and when kittens start growing those cute, round bellies, they’re getting stronger too! And because Finn is a tough little fighter, he learned how to walk and hold himself up.

@thecatlvt/Instagram
@thecatlvt/Instagram

In just a few weeks, Finn has come a long way with help from Ellen, her cat boys, and the clinic staff.

“He has made incredible achievements already and we are confident he will be walking and playing in no time like any healthy kitten should. This is another case of getting out of your comfort zone and treating these patients outside the box regardless of size and age.”

Via Instagram, Ellen shared, “This is the ONLY kitten I’ve ever had that wants to roll back over and go to sleep vs. getting up to eat.”

@thecatlvt/Instagram
@thecatlvt/Instagram

And because of his love for the snug life, Finn has recently discovered the magic of cuddling in Ellen’s jacket. She doesn’t seem to mind, but with a kitten as charming as Finn, who wouldn’t love to have him close at hand!

@thecatlvt

#criticalkitten #rescuecat #fyp #fypkitten #fypcat

♬ Everything I Wanted – Nuq

H/T: www.lovemeow.com
Feature Image: @thecatlvt/Instagram

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Dear Pammy, My cat hits me.

When people tell me, “Help! My cat hits me,” I know what they mean. It’s a paw smack, with some force behind it. Cats hit each other for the same reason. It’s an expression of frustration. A message is not getting through. cat hits me I’ve been seeing some cat-to-cat threatening lately, because Bud, Lou, and Rhiannon are being rowdy …

The post Dear Pammy, My cat hits me. appeared first on the Way of Cats.

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CatSpeak and Supersenses

CatSpeak and Supersenses work together. I think that’s how cats learn people language. For me, communication is everything. Training, care, and affection all flow from mutual understanding. CatSpeak It’s been six weeks since we brought Rhiannon home. Her communication skills are already impressive. She will sit on the kitchen floor and make specific noises when she’s hungry, staring deep into …

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What To Know About Clipping Your Cat’s Nails

Do you trim your cat’s nails? Here’s why you should.

Tigers keep their nails sharp by scratching on tree trunks, and, like their big cousins, cats do the same! When scratching on posts, tree trunks, and even the furniture, cats are not only marking the surface with their scent but also sloughing off the old, frayed layers of their nails to expose fresh, sharp claws ready to pounce on the world.

While kitties do a good job keeping their nails in fine murder-mitten form, extra sharp claws just won’t do in a household setting. With all the soft surfaces and human skin in the house, cat claws that grow too long can cause problems for a kitty. While cats always need their claws, helping them keep their nails at a manageable length is a must. Meaning you and a pair of clippers will need to intervene to save fabric and flesh!

clipping cat's nails

Clipping cat nails may seem like a challenge, but with patience and positive reinforcement, you and your cat will be pros at nail trims in no time. This important task will help save your cat from paw injuries, resulting in nails growing too long and getting hung on soft surfaces. Plus, when cat nails are left to grow, they tend to curl into sharp daggers, which can penetrate the soft paw pad, causing pain.

 

Shadi J. Ireifej, DVM, DACVS of VetTriage also points out, “Nails that are too long are thought to not only be uncomfortable for the cat but also make them more prone to inappropriate behavior like scratching on doors, furniture, and other household items or surfaces.”

How Often Should You Cut Your Cat’s Nails?

While experts recommend every 10 days to 2 weeks as a reasonable basis for cat nail trims, it really depends on your cat’s claws. Dr. Ireifej suggests, “There is no specific guideline as to when to trim a cat’s nails, as each cat has a different rate of nail growth, but eventually you will be able to gauge how often it needs to be done.”

If it’s been a while since the last trim, you’ll know it’s time when your feline starts looking like their paws are stuck to the furniture or the carpet because their claws keep getting caught.

But when it comes to clipping your cat’s nails, where do you start?

trim cat nails

Nail Clippers vs. Grinders

First, you’ll need to choose whether you’ll want to use clippers or a grinder for trimming a cat’s nails.

When it comes to clippers, you can choose either scissors-style, guillotine clippers, or even human nail clippers as cat claws are small enough to fit between the blades. It depends on your preference, but the College of Veterinary Medicine at Washington State University recommends the guillotine or human fingernail clipper as the easiest to use for trimming cat nails and using the scissors-type “if a toenail is so long that it is curling in a circle.”

Some cats could care less about getting their nails trimmed, watching nicely as they wait for the treat they know will come in the end. Other felines can be a nightmare when they see the clippers come out, fighting with all their strength to bail out. For cats who feel mortal terror at the sight or the sound of clippers, try a grinder or an emery board instead.

clipping cat's claws

Grinders will gently grind down the nail, dulling the sharp tip to a blunt length that will keep kitty from getting snagged in the couch or in your skin. But if the grinder’s sound or vibrations bothers a cat’s sensitivities, try a simple nail file instead. Just grab an emery board and give your kitty a mani!

How To Trim Your Cat’s Nails

Okay, so you’ve got the cat and the clippers, let’s get trimming!

Step One: Get Everybody Comfy

Some cats will settle right into your lap for the trim. Others may need convincing and can be bribed with love and treats. Then, there are those cats one might call difficult. And just how do you trim a cat’s nails when they don’t want you to? Very carefully!

Seriously, if your cat is difficult during nail trims, consider wrapping them in a towel or blanket to keep them gently restrained. You’ll only need one paw out of the wrapping at a time. This type of restraint can also help kitty feel calmer.

You can even enlist the help of a second person when trimming your cat’s nails—one person to hold while the other clips.

Step Two: Ready the Paw

With one of your cat’s paw in hand, select a toe, and using your thumb, gently push forward to expose the claw. You’ll notice the sharp, white tip and a pink center closer to the paw. This tiny white tip is what you will trim. It will be so small a clip, you might think you’ve nipped off nothing at all!

how to trim cat's nails

But before you set to clipping or grinding, let’s talk about the pink part inside the claw. Be certain not to cut into this extremely sensitive portion of the nail! Known as the nail’s quick, this soft tissue is rich with nerves and blood vessels and will cause pain if penetrated. Imagine cutting into your nailbed. Yes, that cringe-worthy pain you imagine is the same a cat will feel if their nail quick is nicked!

In case of an accidental cut to the nail quick, apply styptic powder to the bleeding tip. If you don’t have styptic powder, use flour, cornstarch, or even a dry bar of soap to stem the bleeding.

Step Three: Make the Clip

Alright, you’ve learned where to cut the nail and studied your clipper or grinder instructions forwards and back. Your cat is relaxed in your grip, and you’ve identified the safe zone from the quick zone in your cat’s nail. It all comes down to this. Position the blades and make the clip with quick, firm pressure! Repeat on all of those adorable little toes and feet, back paws included.

trim cat's nails

 

Don’t forget the dewclaws! Because dewclaws are situated on the inside of the front paws, these gripper claws can be tricky to clip. You’ll have to maneuver the dewclaw away from the paw, but be careful not to cause discomfort when stretching the claw from the paw for access.

Step Four: Love and Reward

After the nails are nice and tidy, reward your kitty with hugs, kind words, and a load of treats!

clipping cat's nails

If you don’t feel comfortable clipping your cat’s nails, schedule an appointment with the vet to have kitty’s talons trimmed. While you’re there, ask the doctor or vet tech if they’ll demonstrate how to trim a cat’s nails for you.

Tips to Help with Clipping Your Cat’s Nails

  • Don’t introduce clippers for the first time at trimming time. Leave them in places your cat can see and investigate them. Remove the mystery and make a happy fuss about them. This way, your kitty learns the clippers aren’t an instrument brought out for their torture!
  • Encourage your cat to embrace the handling of their paws with frequent paw massages. If cats are used to having their feet touched regularly, it will help the clipping cause for both you and them.
  • Choose a quiet space away from other animals for your cat nail salon. Make sure your spot offers plenty of light. Those claws are small for the seeing!

  • Try different positions if your cat is squirmy during their pedicure. Maybe kitty will like the process better laying on his side rather than being restrained in your arms.
  • Try clicker training to reinforce positive association when it comes to cutting a cat’s nails.
  • Start young. The earlier a cat experiences nail clipping, the easier of a time you’ll have as they age.
  • Trimming time should coincide with a calmer period in your cat’s day. Choose a time when your cat is usually relaxed rather than a high energy playtime. To be sure your cat feels calm for his trim, you could first engage him in a good play session.
  • Treats are a must!
  • Catnip makes everything better!

Though delicate work, trimming cat nails is one of those simple but necessary tasks that will keep you and your kitty living the good life together!

H/T: www.popsugar.com

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‘Kitty Whisperer’ Remembered After Accident Claims Her Life During Cat Rescue

There’s sad news for the rescue world.

One of humanity’s angels has been called home too soon after a tragic accident claimed her life while rescuing an injured cat.

Kaitlyn O’Hara, 27, of Medford, NJ, was working to rescue an injured cat on a snowy roadway when she was struck by a car. According to Randall’s Rescue, Kaitlyn went out after a snowstorm to help a cat thought to be bleeding, and it was “while trying to save another lost soul” that the accident occurred.

Rescue staff described Kaitlyn as “always compassionate and putting animals first.”

Randalls Rescue/Facebook

“Kaitlyn was one of the most kind, compassionate, quirky, fun loving, humorously neurotic, sweetest girls I’ve ever met.”

And Kaitlyn had love for all the cats, even the ones most would never give a second look.

A Friend to “the Shy, Timid and Feral”

Kaitlyn had been fostering cats and kittens for years and had a deep love for bottle babies, grumpy cats, and “the defeated and sickly – but her favorite and possibly best work was with the shy, timid and feral.”

As a kind and gentle soul, Kaitlyn had a way about her which calmed the most nervous of kitties and from her magical touch, she earned her reputation as a “kitty whisperer.”

Randalls Rescue/Facebook

“She had the patience of a saint for those kittens and loved her ‘mittens’, ‘peanut butter cups’ and ‘little men’ (as she called them) so much.”

Employed at the University of Pennsylvania’s Ryan Veterinary Hospital as a veterinary nurse in the anesthesia department, Kaitlyn healed animal lives both on a professional and personal basis. She leaves behind a fiancé, family, and friends who loved her sunshine soul and compassionate heart.

Randalls Rescue/Facebook

Heartbroken at Kaitlyn’s loss, the shelter staff felt, “Her life mattered to so many, and she changed so many lives forever. That doesn’t need to stop … we can continue doing good in her name…”

To honor Kaitlyn’s memory and her work with cats, Randall’s Rescue has set up the Kaitlyn O’Hara Fund to aid in the care of sick and feral cats.

“Please donate what you can for a fellow animal lover, who risked her life to help an animal in need. Who always loved the ones no one else wanted.”

Those feline souls Kaitlyn once helped pass in peace were certainly waiting for her and are now loving her again as we mourn her loss. Kaitlyn O’Hara, the “kitty whisperer,” will forever be remembered for her kind heart and compassion for animals.

Randalls Rescue/Facebook

H/T: www.nj1015.com
Feature Image: Randalls Rescue/Facebook

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How to Fix a Bad Cat

It’s easy to fix a bad cat. Because we were often the one who made them “bad” in the first place. Sadly, how we make them a bad cat is business as usual for many cat owners, when they should be Cat Appreciators. With an owner, there’s some care, maybe even some affection. But when the cat does something which …

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Suspect Arrested In Cruel Death Of Beloved Brooklyn Community Cat

A chubby cat loved by many in his community, Tuxedo’s tragic death left a hole in hearts both human and feline, but justice is finally at work with the arrest of his alleged killer.

Considered the “Mayor” of NYCHA’s Breukelen Houses, Tuxedo was a handsome black and white cat with a heart for the other kitties in his community feral cat colony. He and his lady cat friend, Meanie, often looked out for the new cats who came around. And without his well-dressed best friend to pad around with, cat Supermac has been “very depressed,” according to Latonya Walker, Tuxedo’s caretaker and one of his biggest fans.

Those following the world of feline rescue and TNR know Walker as Sassee Badass, and the feral and stray cats of Brooklyn know her as the kind lady with the yummy food. As one of her charges since 2011, Tuxedo certainly loved Walker, their tight friendship obvious to see in various photos of the pair taken during past interviews. She was devastated over the targeted attack and death of her cherished cat friend.

@sassee_badass_tnr/Instagram

A Good Cat Murdered

On January 13th, Raymond Morales was preparing for work when the sounds of what he thought to be dogs fighting stopped him in his tracks. What he found when he went to investigate was horrifying.

Morales told The New York Post, “I peeked out my window and I saw these two f–king people like antagonizing a cat.”

Tuxedo was up a tree trying to stay away from two riled and snarling dogs. He held onto the branches for dear life as a young man and woman beat at him with a stick in an effort to make him fall. When they succeeded in knocking him from the tree, the man “let the dogs go like ‘get ‘em’ exactly just like that.”

“The cat was screaming, it was trying to defend itself against two pitbulls as best as it can. Seriously, that was the worst.”

Morales yelled for them to stop, but Tuxedo had already been grievously injured, left barely alive by two people’s choice to torture an innocent animal. After his death, The Animal Care Centers of NYC performed an examination that ruled the injuries to Tuxedo’s head and jaw resulted from an attack by two large dogs.

After Tuxedo’s cruel death, Walker learned of six other missing cats in the area, 3 of which were later found dead with injuries similar to Tuxedo’s. She suspects the same dogs could be the culprits in these instances.

Justice in Motion

The justice system is finally in motion regarding Tuxedo’s murder. But it took a monumental effort to make it happen. After much urging by the community, media attention, and an online petition hosted by Animal Victory gathered more than 20,000 signatures from signers worldwide, the NYPD released a wanted poster, revealing the suspects and the dogs in question.

Image Courtesy of Animalvictory.org

After an investigation and nearly a month after Tuxedo’s cruel death, the NYPD arrested Fulton Gordon, 28, on February 8th. He’s been charged with torturing, injuring or not feeding an animal. Considered a misdemeanor crime, Gordon was issued a desk appearance ticket and will be arraigned on a date yet to be scheduled.

Janelle Babington, founder of Animal Victory, commented to The New York Times, “We’re very glad there is an arrest, but we’re very upset that he’s not in jail.”

For those of us who know the importance and magic of animals, we know everything about what Gordon and his girlfriend did was wrong. If indeed complicit in the horrific and terrifying death they doled out to Tuxedo, what they’ve taught their dogs is wrong too. To encourage canine aggression against cats is an act of intolerable cruelty to both species.

In a claim made to The Times, Fulton Gordon says he’s innocent of the charges. He reportedly feels terrible, claiming, “I would never do anything to intentionally harm an animal.”

Gordon insists Tuxedo was hanging from a branch by his paws and that his girlfriend’s dogs got loose by accident. “I was trying to help it.”

Reported video evidence shows otherwise.

Grief, Compassion, and A Desire for Better

Walker holds an ocean of grief in her heart over Tuxedo’s loss, and she’s relieved justice is in motion for the beloved cat’s murder, but her compassionate heart wants more than punishment for Gordon. She also wants him to learn how to be better.

Image Courtesy of Pete Thompson via nypost.com

“I wish we’d learn to love and respect each other, [there’s] enough young black men in jail. Respect goes a long way,” Walker shared with The Post. “And there are people from the hood that love animals, not abusing them.”

As she believes with the cats she so loves, Walker “would prefer to save somebody than to take them down and make them worse. I would love a rehabilitation, I would love to teach them about animals.”

For the rest of the world, Walker offers this message:

“And everyone else, keep your damn animals on the leash and don’t think it’s cute to try to attack anybody because you’re teaching the animal to be a weapon and that’s not fair to the animal.”

Put plainly, Walker has the right of it. Be good to animals; treat them as you want to be treated.

Image Courtesy of Animalvictory.org

After learning of Gordon’s claim to be helping Tuxedo, Walker said she’s open to the idea of Gordon’s claim to innocence and would be “thrilled” if this were the case.

She told him through The New York Times, “That would make me feel so good to know that you didn’t mean to do this and it got out of hand, and you’re not going to do it again.”

Rest Well, Handsome Tuxedo

As cat lovers, we can’t understand how anyone would want to harm a feline. We want a better world for all cats, and this means teaching everyone the importance of compassion. Sadly, this case has seen the loss of a beloved cat, the alleged improper handling of dogs by the people who should do better by them, and fistfuls grief and outrage.

Image Courtesy of Pete Thompson via nypost.com

And while justice for Tuxedo is in motion with Gordon’s arrest, we have to keep working together to save the lives of cats. Hopefully, our work will influence more to our cat cause. And perhaps, one day in the future, we will arrive at a time when no cats have to suffer due to human cruelty.

H/T: www.nypost.com
Feature Image: @sassee_badass_tnr/Instagram & Image Courtesy of Animalvictory.org

The post Suspect Arrested In Cruel Death Of Beloved Brooklyn Community Cat appeared first on iHeartCats.com.

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Kitten Comforts Lion King‘s Simba & You Will Cry Because It’s Too Cute

No matter what anyone says, cats are not aloof overlords who peer down at us from on high. Okay, they are, but at the same time, cats can be loving and tender creatures when someone needs comforting.

And Mika the kitten is a baby cat who still has more love than aloofness about her. In fact, this fluffy kitten has love for everyone, including animated characters.

Mika loves her family, both the humans and her furry cat siblings. She’s the smallest of them, but she might just have the biggest heart. And her playful antics often keep her family’s attention, which is her favorite thing ever!

One of Mika’s people, Nuzair, told The Dodo, “She really likes attention, and she never stops to rest.”

Image courtesy of The Dodo

Kittens Get Emotional Too

But one day, as Nuzair sat down to watch a Disney movie on his computer, Mika decided she wanted to have a little rest and watch too. She crawled up on the desk and began to watch, enthralled by the animation. An idea came to Nuzair seeing Mika so wrapped up in the screen.

“I thought of playing the Mufasa death scene [from ‘The Lion King’] because I remember watching some videos on YouTube where dogs are crying during that scene,” explained Nuzair.

 

u/its_nzr/Reddit

Knowing his kitten’s tendency for comforting others, he was curious to see if her empathy would cross into the land of fantasy. And choosing a Disney movie proved to be an excellent choice. As we all well know, Disney knows how to pull on feels!

“At first, she was distracted by the sounds of the speakers but when she settled in, I started filming it.”

Once Mika saw poor Simba’s distress as he tried to wake dead Mufasa, she rushed for the computer and started pawing at the screen. Watching with his mom, Nuzair said, “We were really surprised to see that happen. The scene is really emotional and Mika trying to comfort Simba hit real hard.”

“I was awed but at the same time really sad to see that.”

u/its_nzr/Reddit

But it seems Mika recovered from the emotional blow faster than the rest of us, Nazir shared on Reddit, “Thankfully she slept after.”

Once Mika woke from her nap, she had fun with her toys, playing hard as sweet and silly kittens should!

And if you need more animals enjoying Disney movies, check out the AnimalswatchDisney Lounge on Reddit!

This is what my Kitty did while watching Lion King. from aww

H/T: www.thedodo.com
Feature Image: The Dodo & u/its_nzr/Reddit

The post Kitten Comforts <i>Lion King</i>‘s Simba & You Will Cry Because It’s Too Cute appeared first on iHeartCats.com.

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Cooking For Kitty: The Benefits Of Homemade Cat Food

As a cat parent who loves your special kitty, you want to feed him the best food available and, in your home, this might mean learning how to make homemade cat food.

But the world of the cat chef isn’t as cut and dry as buying a pack of chicken breasts, boiling them up, and feeding it to your purrrsnickety feline patron. Sure, kitty will gobble the chicken down, but meat alone won’t offer your cat the full range of nutrients he needs.

When cats eat small prey, they eat bones, organs, muscles, and skin in order to get the full range of healthy benefits from their snacks. Dr. Lisa A. Pierson, DVM, says, “Keep in mind:  Bones = calcium (etc.)…..Meat = phosphorus.”

Learning how to make homemade cat food is serious business and you can’t be squeamish in the kitchen if you want to feed your kitty right. Keep in mind, cats require very specific nutrients to maintain good health. So, before you start crafting a purrsonalized dining experience, let’s have a look at what cat bodies need to stay strong and healthy.

homemade cat food

What Cats Require for a Healthy Diet

Cats need certain nutrients to remain in top form, and as obligate carnivores, cats require meat.

Ryan Llera, BSc, DVM and Ernest Ward, DVM, explain cats depend on certain nutrients, many of which can only be found in animal sources. “Examples include certain essential fatty acids, minerals and vitamins (especially calcium, vitamin A and niacin).”

As cat bodies don’t make taurine or arginine, it is important cats eat a diet rich in meat and fish in order to obtain these vital nutrients. According to Dr. Deborah Linder, a board-certified veterinary nutritionist and head of the Tufts Obesity Clinic for Animals, taurine is vital for growth in young cats and reproductive health in females.

“In addition, when cats are fed a diet too low in taurine they can become blind as a result of retinal degeneration and their heart can become enlarged and not be able to pump blood appropriately (dilated cardiomyopathy).”

Arginine is an amino acid which aids in the removal of ammonia from a cat’s body and “if cats cannot remove the ammonia from their bodies, they can suffer weight loss, vomiting, neurological signs, and even death.”

homemade cat food recipe

Taurine and Arginine are just two pieces in the complex puzzle of cat nutrition. To form the whole, healthy picture, be sure your homemade cat food recipe includes all of the following:

  • Meat or fish proteins
  • Water
  • Minerals, like calcium and iron, to mention a couple
  • Vitamins, including vitamin A, vitamin D, and niacin
  • Fatty acids, such as omega 3 and omega 6
  • Amino acids, including taurine and arginine, which are obtained from meat

If you’re following expert-crafted cat food recipes, these experts know the importance of feeding your kitty a homemade cat food recipe rich with meat, bones, specially-formulated feline supplements, and the occasional fresh fruits and veggies. In crafting recipes, they include ingredients that will provide all the healthy stuff a cat needs.

So, before you start creating your own cat food concoctions, follow experts first, talk with your vet, and do copious amounts of homework on feline nutrition. Start your journey into feline nutrition with these 4 ways to feed your cat’s brain.

The Benefits of Homemade Cat Food

When weighing the options of commercial cat food versus homemade cat food, whether raw or cooked, consider these benefits:

  • Total control over ingredients, great for cats with allergies or specialized dietary needs.
  • Cost-efficient when compared to purchasing commercial cat food.
  • Bulk preparation allows for an always-stocked freezer.
  • Healthy skin and coat thanks to fresh ingredients.
  • Less stink and easier scooping in the litter pan.
  • Complete customization for the pickiest of palates.
  • Feeding cats fresh meat and recipes with added water offers up much needed moisture and helps to keep cats hydrated.

Raw Cat Food Benefits

Homemade raw cat food is a topic which divides many in the field of feline nutrition. Some cat experts warn of food-borne illness risks and nutrient deficiencies. But those who tout feeding a homemade raw cat food diet believe the benefits of a raw food diet for cats are far greater than the risks, especially with safe handling procedures reducing illness risks.

Want to know more about the good a raw food diet can do for your cat? Check out these 5 benefits to raw!

how to make homemade cat food

Risks Involved in Homemade Cat Food

While making homemade cat food (either cooked or raw) provides many great benefits, it also has some risk factors of which you need to be aware:

  • Improper handling of ingredients can cause food-borne illness, like salmonella, listeria, and E. coli.
  • Not following recipes can result in nutrient deficiency, which can lead to severe illness and even death.
  • Accidental overfeeding of nutritional supplements can cause health issues too. For example, if you’re using meat bones, cats pick up calcium from this natural source. Giving them a calcium supplement on top of bones can lead to an excess of calcium which can in turn cause kidney or bladder stones.

Transitioning to Homemade from Canned Food

Like anything with cats, you’ve got to give them time to adjust to change. Felines aren’t known to be accepting of things outside routine and new food can be a shakeup. When it’s time to start the switch from canned food to homemade, go slow and move in phases.

First, introduce a commercial raw pet food to initiate a change in texture and taste while also still feeding commercial cat food made with all essential nutrients. This gives your cat a heads-up something new is happening while helping his tummy adjust to a new type of food. Once you’ve fully transitioned to the commercial raw food and your darling seems to be handling it well, then you’ll slowly introduce your kitty to your cooking. Small steps are key when it comes to success with felines!

Meaty Choices

When getting ready to start making your own cat food, ask yourself this: Does your cat have a favorite meat? Probably so, and it’s usually pretty easy to figure which it is. Does he go cuckoo for chicken but just eats the beef because it’s there? Or does tuna turn his head while turkey just doesn’t do it for his taste buds?

homemade cat food benefits

Only you know the answer to the preferences of your cat’s palate, but here are some fun facts regarding what benefits felines take from different meat sources:

  • Chicken – Poultry provides linoleic acid, an omega 6 fatty acid essential for healthy skin, fur, and muscles.
  • Turkey – Dark meat turkey and turkey hearts contain high taurine levels, which is necessary for all the feline body systems Deficiencies can lead to blindness.
  • Beef – Rich in B12, also known as cobalamin, beef promotes immune, digestive, and nervous system health in cats.
  • Fish – While cats should eat fish in moderation, fish oils provide Omega-3, which give a cat shiny fur, less inflammation, and more energy.
  • Duck – In cats with poultry allergies, duck is often used as a hypoallergenic alternative.
  • Rabbit – Another good choice for cats with allergies, rabbit meat connects a cat to their small animal diet roots.

Tools You’ll Need for Making Your Own Cat Food

Your kitchen is most likely already equipped with items like mixing bowls and utensils, but here are a few more things you’ll need for making your own cat food:

  • Meat grinder that can handle bones
  • Dietary scale for exact measurements
  • Sharp meat knives and shears
  • Sturdy cutting boards
  • Glass storage jars or containers
  • Disposable gloves

A few things to remember when it comes to making your own cat food:

  • Be sure to stay away from foods considered toxic to cats.
  • Always remember the importance of following all food handling safety procedures to prevent contamination and food-borne illness.
  • Do not substitute ingredients in these homemade cat food recipes. They have been crafted by feline experts and changing them could result in nutrient deficiencies.
  • When buying whole meats, be sure to purchase from trusted suppliers.
  • Never feed cats cooked bones.

Vet-Approved Homemade Cat Food Recipe

For cats with normal nutrition needs, check out this homemade cat food recipe from catinfo.org:

  • 3 lbs. of chicken, turkey, or rabbit parts with skin, organs, and bones, if possible
  • 4 oz. of liver – Add liver if the chosen meat does not include organs
  • 2 1/3 tablespoons bone meal, if not using bones and a grinder
  • 1 cup water or more if your cat prefers a wetter food.
  • 2 eggs – Keep the yolks raw yolks but lightly cook the whites by boiling for 3-4 minutes.
  • 2000 mg fish oil – Dr. Pierson points out, “Oil from fish that are lower on the food chain are less contaminated with heavy metals and other impurities.”
  • 400 IU vitamin E
  • 100 mg vitamin B-complex
  • 2000 mg taurine, powdered
  • ¾ tsp lite salt with iodine

Bake meat and liver at 350 degrees until half raw. Reserve drippings. If not using a grinder, remove meat and skin from the bone and cut into bite-size chunks. Mix chunked meat with cooked egg white and meat drippings in a large bowl. Set aside.

In a separate bowl, mix water, egg yolks, salt, and all supplements. Combine this mixture with the meat slurry. Portion into containers and freeze! Fresh and thawed containers will keep in the fridge for 48-72 hours. Freeze any jars not going to be used within this timeframe.

Recipe yields enough food for “one cat for approximately 10-14 days” when feeding your cat approximately 4-6 ounces per day. For Dr. Pierson’s tips on how best to mix this tasty meal, as well as her recommendations on bone size safety when grinding, visit catinfo.org.

raw cat food

Cooked Cat Food Recipe

This Easy Homemade Cat Food with Chicken and Rice comes from Catpet.club’s Jimmie O’Chutt and was reviewed by veterinary consultant Claudine Sievert.

  • 2/3 cup baked dark chicken meat
  • 1/3 cup boiled white rice
  • 1/4 cup boiled potato
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon Rx Vitamins Nutritional Support for Cats

Mix all ingredients and serve!

You’ll notice this recipe calls for rice and, while a tasty addition, carbs like rice and oats aren’t necessary for cat bodies. But like moderated starchy goodness does for the human body, Rebecca Remillard, board-certified veterinary nutritionist for MSPCA Angell Animal Medical Center, explains, a small number of carbs might provide cats with extra energy and help save on costs when making homemade cat food.

Cat Food Gravy Recipe

For cats who enjoy life on the saucier side, here’s a vet-approved recipe for homemade cat food gravy from Excitedcats.com.

  • Add all extra portions of chicken, pork, beef etc., including skin, fat, and bones to large pot.
  • Fill the pot with water add 1/2 teaspoon of salt.
  • Bring to a boil and reduce heat to medium. Cover and let simmer for 2-3 hours, stirring occasionally.
  • Allow to cool and then strain. Repeat straining until only liquid remains.
  • Portion into containers and “freeze for a great yet simple gravy to place on top of your dry cat food.”

For more good gravy recipes, check out excitedcats.com.

Homemade Cat Food Recipes for Specialized Dietary Needs

For cats with specialized dietary needs, making homemade cat food gives you control over exactly what goes into your cat’s sensitive stomach. But before you start making special food to help a cat with medical issues, discuss diet and nutrition with your vet.

For example, if your cat has renal problems and you search the internet for homemade cat food for kidney disease, you’ll find recipes, but you’ll need to be sure the ingredients and their amounts are vet-approved. Safe homemade cat food recipes for kidney disease will contain extra water or broth but less salt, protein, and phosphorous than normal diets in order to help taxed kidneys have an easier time of filtering.

homemade cat food

Once you’ve found a recipe you think your cat will enjoy, show a copy of it to your veterinarian for their approval. After all, this is the medical team treating your cat. They know her exact needs and can help you adjust diet and ingredients to best suit kitty dear.

Cats with urinary problems, diabetes, and thyroid issues can also benefit from homemade custom diets, but definitely talk with your vet before you start buzzing around the kitchen. Nutrient balance and portion size are important discussion points to have with the doctor as part of keeping your cat’s health in check.

Even if your cat is healthy and requires a normal adult cat diet, before embarking on a homemade cat food journey, discuss this path with your kitty’s veterinarian.

Once you’ve had the conversation, done your research, and have gathered all your ingredients, it’s time to get cooking and feed your feline prince or princess the feast they deserve!

how to make cat food at home

The post Cooking For Kitty: The Benefits Of Homemade Cat Food appeared first on iHeartCats.com.

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